About this time, the Bureau of Navigation decided to cease making a distinction between land and sea station call letters, and began to assign KD calls to all new stations. In the West, however, a normal alphabetical sequence was followed; since all the KE calls had been issued, after the KD calls would follow KF and then KG. In 1912, shortly after this assignment of new call signs was made, the London International Radiotelegraphic Convention was signed. Before there were radio call letters, there were other identifiers that contributed to the development of call letters. KD | Initially after the 1906 agreements on call letter assignments, three-letter calls were issued to ships and shore stations that communicated with them. KU | Search for am and fm radio stations by entering their call letters into the search box. These were generally one or two letters, which were generally self-designated; as each station only communicated with other stations operated by the same telegraph company, there were no requirements for any coordination to avoid conflicts between different stations. According to the June 30, 1928 Radio Service Bulletin[1], the requirement for amateur and experimental stations to carry national letter prefixes became effective on January 1, 1929. Find Radio Stations by U.S. State.

In order to ensure that these were unique, the Bureau of Navigation, established by law in 1884, was charged with the assignment of signal letters to U. S. ships. KS | In order to ensure that these were unique, the … Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. The Bureau determined that the 1884 act (mentioned earlier) which gave it the right to assign signal-flag codes to ships could be used as a basis to assign radio call signs as well. WB | Adult … In addition, N calls were reserved for government stations, and those beginning WU, WV, WX, WY, and WZ for the Army, so only KD to KZ, WA to WT, and WW calls were available. Two of these were the signal flag codes used to identify ships at sea and the calls used by land telegraph stations. WHPR Power Talk 88.1 FM. Every station and operator along a telegraph line was assigned a short "call" or "signal." Find Phone Numbers and Websites for Commercials you heard On The Radio!!!

KT | Also, because of the Panama Canal connecting the two oceans, ships no longer could easily be divided into East Coast and West Coast fleets. KK | Along about June 1920, the last of the KU four-letter calls available for ships was used up. This list is complete and up to date as of, Lists of radio stations in the United States (by call sign), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with KA–KF), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with WA–WF), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with KG–KM), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with WG–WM), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with KN–KS), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with WN–WS), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with KT–KZ), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with WT–WZ), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KA–KC), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WA–WC), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KD–KF), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WD–WF), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KG–KJ), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WG–WJ), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KK–KM), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WK–WM), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KN–KP), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WN–WP), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KQ–KS), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WQ–WS), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KT–KV), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WT–WV), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KW–KZ), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WW–WZ), https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_AM_radio_stations_in_the_United_States_by_call_sign_(initial_letters_KA–KF)&oldid=979386621, Lists of radio stations in the United States, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing potentially dated statements from May 2020, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 20 September 2020, at 12:52. KE | (Note that the document did not, however, contemplate assigning four-letter calls to ships and shore stations. These were published in books issued at intervals, called "Merchant Vessels of the United States.". As a result, the supply of three-letter calls became quickly exhausted, and the U. S. Government began issuing four-letter calls. From that point on, three-letter calls were only issued to stations that had previously used that same call (see WHN.). Because the call letter includes a code for the frequency, whenever the frequency changes, a new call sign is required. WK |

They are discussed below. WH | This is a list of AM radio stations in the United States having call signs beginning with the letters KA to KF. KI | Ship call letter assignments prior to 1912. For example, see K243BG and K244CS. Originally, the FCC required FM and TV stations to have unique call letters, so the FM station owned by WHN was WHNF and the TV station owned by WCBS was WCBW.

KJ | KR | It should be noted that the frequency itself does not appear but is coded, so if the frequency is 88.1 + x, the numeric appearing in the call sign is 201 + 5x. This list is complete and up to date as of, Lists of radio stations in the United States (by call sign), List of FM radio stations in the United States by call sign (initial letters KD-KF), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with KA–KF), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with WA–WF), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with KG–KM), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with WG–WM), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with KN–KS), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with WN–WS), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with KT–KZ), AM radio stations by call sign (starting with WT–WZ), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KA–KC), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WA–WC), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KD–KF), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WD–WF), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KG–KJ), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WG–WJ), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KK–KM), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WK–WM), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KN–KP), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WN–WP), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KQ–KS), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WQ–WS), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KT–KV), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WT–WV), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with KW–KZ), FM radio stations by call sign (starting with WW–WZ), https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_FM_radio_stations_in_the_United_States_by_call_sign_(initial_letters_KD–KF)&oldid=985353300, Lists of radio stations in the United States, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing potentially dated statements from October 2020, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 25 October 2020, at 13:26. All early radio work was done in Morse code, and spelling out an operator's full name or location would have been cumbersome, so the system of assigning call letters was adapted from land telegraphy, as described above. The initial list is given in this document. Originally all stations with -FM or -TV suffixes were affiliates of AM stations, but when WJZ in New York City became WABC in 1953, Westinghouse, which had originally started WJZ, requested the right to restore those call letters, and eventually, after over five years, was granted the right to use WJZ-TV for its Baltimore station on channel 13. It initially intended to follow the same plan as for ships for call letters (K prefixes in the east, W in the west), according to the above-mentioned publication of the Bureau, but the actual assignments were the reverse. An international set of flags was used at sea to identify individual ships. Soon afterward, in April, 1921, policy was changed again, and three-letter calls were resumed (W in the east and K in the west), so that Westinghouse's next station, for example, was assigned the call letters WJZ. The first digit was used to indicate a region of the country (See the sections labeled "Amateur Stations" and "Special Classes of Stations" in this document). KC | Thus, stations "calling" each other were able to link up with a minimum of sorting out identities. WY | So signs beginning KA through KC had to be reassigned. P.J. In the US, the Revenue Cutter Service (now the U. S. Coast Guard) adopted calls consisting of RC and a third letter, and on November 20, 1909, the U. S. Navy switched to three-letter calls starting with N from a wide range of two-letter calls. For some reason, in mid-1928 a jump was made from W-B- calls to WHDH, skipping the rest of the W-B- sequence, all the W-C- group, and the beginning of the W-D- group; from that point, the W-E- and W-F- calls were issued. Land stations, less numerous, continued to be given three-letter calls, and the number of available three-letter calls was augmented by two groups of calls formerly assigned to ships: because of superstitions, calls of ships that had sunk were not re-issued; in addition, ships which were sold to another country had their call retired. The first four-letter call issued in the West under this plan was KDYL in Salt Lake City, Utah, which was also the longest-surviving of the stations of this era.

For FM stations, a new call-letter plan was adopted in 1941 that was intended to be systematic; first a K or W, then two digits representing the frequency, then one or two letters representing the location. During this era there were few standards, and as call signs were self-assigned, this often resulted in problems when, for example, two or more ships chose the same call. WR | The 1941 systematic (frequency and city-based) call letter scheme lasted only until November 1, 1943, and at that time the call letters were normalized, except (as stated in the previous paragraph) for some experimental-type calls. (See this list of K calls and this list of W calls.) The last call assigned was KDJZ, (to a ship, Montgomery City), so the next call in alphabetical sequence was KDKA. WHPR-FM. In 1987 a change in the rules was made, and stations with -FM and -TV suffixes no longer have to be under the same ownership or in the same market as AM stations with the corresponding call.

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